Handwriting

Posted by Katie McLaughlin on July 6, 2009

How many people actually have ledgiable handwriting? How hard is it to be able to take a pen and be able to draw a series of symbols that another person can interpret and understand their meaning?

Being able to use a pencil to write words is a skill that is trained from age 2 or whenever you find those crayons and a large white wall to scribble on. And yet it takes many years before you’re allowed to start using a pen (if you were educated in a school which had a handwriting test before you were granted a ‘pen licence’, usually by age 10).

And yet, a lot of people can’t write to save their life. Doctors are printing prescriptions out to save time, ink, and inconvenience when the pharmacist can’t decipher if the patient needs tamiflu or tynocl. Scribbling a note for yourself at the end of a Friday afternoon can lead to a Monday morning of confusion trying to work out what the heck ‘get 2 documnt by urhgls’ meant.

The only solution to this problem is for the government to distribute dymo label makers to every man woman and child. Formatted print with limited pictographs will take over the written word. They also last longer, and come in many pretty colours. Alturnatively, pen liceneses could require renewing with a handwriting test every 2 years until retirement.

glasnt can’t work out if T’s are L’s with mislocated horizontal strokes.